Comments: "The Problem" and it's problems

Comments

PREACH IT!
Obviously, I could not agree more; I think it's now clear that the curve of the "left"'s failure over the last forty years maps nicely to its inability to offer people any goal or positive aspiration, whether near- or long-term.

What needs to be articulated - what I feel there are far too few people working on in an accessible voice - is an appealing and achievable vision of a world worth living in. Not a world of gleaming, identical housing blocks marching to the horizon, each peopled by fervent and happy masses of Homo Sovieticus - one that's recognizably ours, warts and all, simply founded on sustainable, practicable structures that might actually afford the majority of humanity a less fear-ridden existence.

Difficult, but not beyond reach.

"Its time to discard the notions of "resistance", "revolution" and the excessive reliance on "critical" theory. There is no war for the left to fight, no "system" to revolt against. There is a time and space for the critical, but there also need for the constructive and positive, both in reality and theory."

You've just made the same mistake you dinged Shaviro on.

???

could you elaborate? not quite sure what your getting at. I think the meaning is pretty clear to any one reading the text as a whole. None the less I've spliced the text up a bit to ward off deconstructivists who privilege the microtext over the broader meaning...

it now reads:

"Its time to move beyond the notions of "resistance", "revolution" and the excessive reliance on "critical" theory. There is no known war for the left to fight, no proven "system" to revolt against. There is a time and space for the critical, but there also need for the constructive and positive, both in reality and theory."

The tendency is general. Most of the factions of the right, except a little sliver of it that happens to be in power, are vociferously anti-State, and even those in power play heavily to the anti-Statist elements. And one can read political apathy to be disgust not with the State per se but with the most public face of Democracy. In fact, I would say that most anti-Statism attempts to appeal to this mood. To say it another way, anti-Statism is the articulation of political apathy in the political sphere.

I guess what I'm saying is that the tendency toward totalistic thinking isn't just a characteristic of the Left; it's a human tendency.

As far as positive aspirations go, I think it's always the time to get back to fundamentals: emphasize the fact that Democracy is a process, not an end in itself, and the State is meant to guarantee that process. That's not the whole of it, but it's a start.