Comments: The Long Tale of 2006

Comments

Nice piece. I concur. tV

"Of course a couple of those top 10 sites are actually places like YouTube and MySpace where large amounts of user generated content drives traffic and then deposits money in hands not of the creators, but instead in the coffers of the large corporate landlords."

Oh dear! Oh dear! The people who provide the opportunity to create the content don't do this out of altruism? How corrupt of them!

The important detail is whether the content creator still owns the content created. I know nothing about MySpace, but a recent debate on Boingboing seemed to conclude that Youtubes's terms of service weren't that bad.

I hate your critique of the long tale. What exactly is wrong with inequality in content? The most popular sites have the most hits and some have hardly any. So what. If you ranked all the stories in english literature by reading frequency Shakespeare would probably come near the top, my last school essay would come near the bottom. That's fare, because frankly my last essay wasn't worth reading.

Your analysis of the long tale in wealth annoyed me too. What is wrong with earning $8000 a week if you are worth $8000 a week? There is something unjust about only earning $8000 a year, and societies should try and rectify poverty. But don't get confused: the problem is that poor people exist, not that rich people do.

"Of course a couple of those top 10 sites are actually places like YouTube and MySpace where large amounts of user generated content drives traffic and then deposits money in hands not of the creators, but instead in the coffers of the large corporate landlords."

Oh dear! Oh dear! The people who provide the opportunity to create the content don't do this out of altruism? How corrupt of them!

The important detail is whether the content creator still owns the content created. I know nothing about MySpace, but a recent debate on Boingboing seemed to conclude that Youtubes's terms of service weren't that bad.

I hate your critique of the long tale. What exactly is wrong with inequality in content? The most popular sites have the most hits and some have hardly any. So what. If you ranked all the stories in english literature by reading frequency Shakespeare would probably come near the top, my last school essay would come near the bottom. That's fare, because frankly my last essay wasn't worth reading.

Your analysis of the long tale in wealth annoyed me too. What is wrong with earning $8000 a week if you are worth $8000 a week? There is something unjust about only earning $8000 a year, and societies should try and rectify poverty. But don't get confused: the problem is that poor people exist, not that rich people do.

"Of course a couple of those top 10 sites are actually places like YouTube and MySpace where large amounts of user generated content drives traffic and then deposits money in hands not of the creators, but instead in the coffers of the large corporate landlords."

Oh dear! Oh dear! The people who provide the opportunity to create the content don't do this out of altruism? How corrupt of them!

The important detail is whether the content creator still owns the content created. I know nothing about MySpace, but a recent debate on Boingboing seemed to conclude that Youtubes's terms of service weren't that bad.

I hate your critique of the long tale. What exactly is wrong with inequality in content? The most popular sites have the most hits and some have hardly any. So what. If you ranked all the stories in english literature by reading frequency Shakespeare would probably come near the top, my last school essay would come near the bottom. That's fare, because frankly my last essay wasn't worth reading.

Your analysis of the long tale in wealth annoyed me too. What is wrong with earning $8000 a week if you are worth $8000 a week? There is something unjust about only earning $8000 a year, and societies should try and rectify poverty. But don't get confused: the problem is that poor people exist, not that rich people do.

We live in the age of diversity - the long tail will provail simply because everyone want their product, service or whatever that little bit unique - customised, bespoke, individual.
I will be reading Chris Anderson's Long Tail on my next vaction as I'm very much intrigued.

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